Nexus of Good: Building emotional resilience

Nexus of Good: Building emotional resilience

Children from low socio-economic background lack the essential skills to cope up with emotional and financial instability caused by poverty. Currently, 128 million children are enrolled in the Indian public education system. These children live in poverty, with most having a household income of USD two or less a day.

Their vulnerabilities lead to reduced attentiveness, lack of curiosity, demotivation, powerlessness, shame and anger. These factors result in reduced motivation to learn, relationship building skills and emotional resilience. Apart from affecting their academic performance, this also takes a toll on their mental and emotional well-being, overall productivity and life choices. More specifically, this makes them less likely to pursue higher education, decrease employability and disrupt their positive mental health.

Children from the low socio-economic background in India generally lack the resources to access private education and rely rather on public education. Within such systems, at the government and the teacher level, there is a general alignment on the need to focus on the holistic improvement of underprivileged children.

However, the government and the teachers currently lack the expertise to equip children with the necessary skills to tackle the ill-effects of poverty, cope up with their reality and go on to become productive and healthy lifelong learners. As a result, there is an alarming gap between the skills our most vulnerable children need and the skills that the public education system provides.

It is in the aforementioned context that Richa Gupta, Vedant Jain and Malika Taneja founded Labhya Foundation, an educational non-profit that enables children from low socio-economic backgrounds with necessary skills to cope with the ill-effects of poverty and become life-long learners through Social Emotional Learning (SEL) interventions at scale. The founders themselves came from the realities of social adversity, financial instability and emotional distress. They had to cope with their realities of financial and emotional instability at a young age. However, there was a clear understanding that their journeys had been driven by unique opportunities and access that not all children from low socio-economic backgrounds have. This understanding drove Labhya Foundation’s inception in 2017 and continues to define its mission, vision and work through the years.

SEL is the process of exploring one’s emotions, maintaining healthy relationships and understanding one’s role and purpose in the long term. It is considered one of the most powerful tools for social change and poverty reduction: every USD invested in SEL programmes yields USD 11 in lifelong gains in health, education, and employment. (Columbia University)

Labhya Foundation partners with state governments to co-create localised statewide SEL programmes for all children enrolled in public schools of partner states. Through these programmes, they co-create a 30-minute daily SEL class or “Happiness Class” for all students between grades K-8.

For effective co-creation […]

Continue reading the rest at www.millenniumpost.in

Children who show a blunted neural response to errors may be at risk of psychopathology

Children who show a blunted neural response to errors may be at risk of psychopathology

A study from Brain and Behavior found that children who respond to errors with a larger error-related negativity (ERN) fared better on a range of psychological outcomes one to two years later — including anxiety, depression, and emotion regulation. The study authors say the ERN may serve as a neuromarker of resilience in children.

The error-related negativity response is an electrical brain signal that occurs after a person makes a behavioral mistake. The response stems from the anterior cingulate cortex and has been identified as an indicator of future mental health. However, the research findings are somewhat contradictory. Some studies have suggested that an enlarged ERN in childhood predicts worse mental health, while other studies have found better mental health among children with larger ERNs.

Study authors Jamie M. Lawler and her team conducted a study to explore the link between ERN activity in young children and the development of emotion regulation, cognitive control, and psychopathology one to two years later.

“About 1 in 5 kids experiences an emotional or behavioral problem but we as a field are not very good at predicting which kids that will be. Our research is one part of trying to understand how to identify children early so that we can hopefully intervene before big problems develop,” said Lawler, an assistant professor at Eastern Michigan University and director of the Self-regulation, Early Experience, and Development Lab .

Their study made use of data from a larger project and included two time points. At the baseline assessment, children were between the ages of 4 and 7 and took part in a “Go/No Go Task” — a cognitive task that requires participants to respond to certain stimuli and refrain from responding to other stimuli. The “Go/No Go” task was used to measure ERN. The children’s parents completed reports of their child’s cognitive control, negative affectivity, and internalizing and externalizing symptoms.

From the initial sample, the researchers selected a subset of children who either showed a high ERN amplitude (15 children) or a low ERN amplitude (15 children). The groups were matched by age and sex as closely as possible. At a follow-up study around one to two years later, the two groups of children completed several tests to assess cognitive control, and their parents also completed assessments of the child’s cognitive control. Both the children and their parents additionally completed measures of child emotion regulation and internalizing and externalizing symptoms.

At baseline, the group of children with a high ERN amplitude fared better according to parental reports of cognitive control, negative affectivity (e.g., anger, fear, discomfort), and externalizing symptoms (e.g., aggression, overactivity) compared to the low ERN group. Moreover, when reassessed one to two years later, the high ERN group continued to […]

Continue reading the rest at www.psypost.org

Social Emotional Learning Programs Help Schools Recover From COVID Learning Loss

Looking to develop emotional intelligence in your students? Contact curaFUN today to get the social development program your school needs!

curaFUN, a nonprofit organization dedicated to building children’s emotional fitness, has released a series of programs aimed at building social intelligence, especially in Asian and 3rd culture kids.

Go to https://www.curafun.com/schools to learn more.

This latest announcement will help your school provide critical emotional and social education for your students, enabling children to develop the emotional intelligence and cultural fluidity to thrive academically.

Research shows that social intelligence is an important factor in academic success. A recent study showed an 11% increase in the academic progress in students that received social emotional education. These students also demonstrated improved classroom behavior, the ability to manage stress and sustain positive attitudes about themselves, school and their peers.

curaFUN responds to these trends by releasing a series of programs that turn psychoeducational assessment and social emotional education into gamified, interactive online experiences. These programs will enable your students to develop inner strengths such as communication, discipline, cooperation, empathy, confidence and resilience.

curaFUN will work with your school to proactively and reliably identify areas where children need additional development and apply a personalized curriculum based on the unique needs of each student. Moreover, the organization’s StrengthBuilder programs include continuous evaluation and valuable professional assessment reports and data detailing the student’s progress.

The organization’s programs can provide schools without a full-time school psychologist, speech therapist, counsellor, or instructional aides with economical and personalized learning solutions that are proven to reduce behavioral incidents and student crises, decreasing the need for counselling hours and support services. The programs also fulfill speech and social emotional education requirements with no additional staffing or training.

curaFUN currently offers programs for children aged 5-11 in Mandarin Chinese and English and are expanding their coverage to meet demand.

Originally developed as part of a US Department of Education and National Science Foundation Grant, curaFUN is committed to helping children achieve greater success by fostering social and emotional skills.

A spokesperson for the organization said: “Our programs are the ideal solution for schools and educators looking to implement social emotional learning to the curriculum. curaFUN gives students the tools they need thrive in school and in the world.”

Contact curaFUN today to get the emotional social intelligence education programs your students need to thrive!

curaFUN has the proven social emotional education programs to help children succeed academically and in the real world! Go to https://www.curafun.com/schools/ to learn how you can get curaFUN’s programs today.

Mandarin/English Social Emotional Education Program For Schools Launched

curaFUN, a nonprofit organization dedicated to building children’s emotional fitness, has released a series of programs aimed at building social emotional skills, available in English and Chinese.

For more information, visit https://www.curafun.com/schools

This latest announcement will help schools provide critical emotional and social education for their students, enabling children to develop the emotional intelligence and cultural fluidity to thrive academically.

Research shows that social intelligence is an important factor in academic success. A recent study showed an 11% increase in the academic progress in students that received social emotional education. These students also demonstrated improved classroom behavior, the ability to manage stress and sustain positive attitudes about themselves, school and their peers.

curaFUN responds to these trends by releasing a series of programs that turn psychoeducational assessment and social emotional education into gamified, interactive online experiences. These programs enable children to develop inner strengths such as communication, discipline, cooperation, empathy, confidence and resilience.

curaFUN works with schools to proactively and reliably identify areas where children need additional development and apply a personalized curriculum based on the unique needs of each student. Moreover, the organization’s StrengthBuilder programs include continuous evaluation and valuable professional assessment reports and data detailing the student’s progress.

The organization’s programs provide schools without an full-time school psychologist, speech therapist, counsellor, or instructional aides with economical and personalized learning solutions that are proven to reduce behavioral incidents and student crises, decreasing the need for counselling hours and support services. The programs also fulfill speech and social emotional education requirements with no additional staffing or training.

curaFUN currently offers subscription-based programs for children aged 5-11 in Mandarin Chinese and English and are expanding their coverage to meet demand.

Originally developed as part of a US Department of Education and National Science Foundation Grant, curaFUN is committed to helping children achieve greater success by fostering social and emotional skills.

A spokesperson for the organization said: “Our programs are the ideal solution for schools and educators looking to implement social emotional learning to the curriculum. curaFUN gives students the tools they need thrive in school and in the world.”

###

Interested parties can find out more by visiting the organization’s website at https://www.curafun.com

Grit matters when a child is learning to read, even in poor South African schools

Grit matters when a child is learning to read, even in poor South African schools

Focusing on socio-emotional skills such as grit may help more children succeed in school. School quality is important in determining children’s success at school. But individual characteristics of the child also play a role. In particular, researchers and teachers are starting to pay more attention to the part that social and emotional skills play in academic success. These are also known as character skills or soft skills. This interest in the “softer” side of learning stems from a movement in economics. It looks for statistical evidence of the importance of soft skills in a number of domains, including the labour market and even marriage. One question this research hasn’t answered yet is whether social and emotional skills also matter in contexts where resources are severely lacking. It’s known from high-income countries that these skills are important for student achievement. But are they important in schools that don’t have basic instructional materials, or when a child’s teacher lacks content knowledge and pedagogical skill? Is there a benefit to having these skills when there’s limited time and opportunity to learn in the school day? I set out to answer these questions, looking specifically at the skill of grit: perseverance and passion for long-term goals . I examined the association between grit and reading achievement among 2,300 pupils in poorly resourced South African schools. South Africa’s reading achievement is notoriously poor. The 2016 round of the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study showed that 78% of Grade 4 children could not read . When children at this level can’t read, they can’t learn anything in the curriculum . My study is the first to estimate the relationship between grit and reading among primary school learners in an African context. I found that grit was the strongest predictor of reading achievement, regardless of […]

ADHD and Self-Harm: How to Help the Girls Who Suffer Most

ADHD and Self-Harm: How to Help the Girls Who Suffer Most

We’ll say it one more time, for the people in back: ADHD is gender neutral.

Boys are no more likely to have it than are girls. But they are much more likely to get diagnosed. In fact, boys diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD or ADD) outnumber girls by roughly three to one. And this disparity is fueling a serious public health problem for girls with ADHD.

Unlike boys, who are more often diagnosed with hyperactivity or impulsivity and can draw more attention to themselves, girls tend to show fewer outward symptoms of ADHD. These differences fuel the erroneous belief that girls don’t have ADHD as often as do boys. The truth is that traits of ADHD can look different in girls: daydreaming in class, silliness or spaciness, shyness, picking at self, perfectionism, feeling anxious or sad, forgetfulness, emotional dysregulation, and trouble keeping friends. When girls receive early and appropriate diagnoses, they will benefit from effective interventions and flourish. There is plenty of hope and promise for girls with ADHD.

Still, it’s important for caregivers and educators to be aware of studies from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) that paint a sobering picture of possible outcomes, especially for untreated girls with ADHD. Compared to young women without ADHD, those with ADHD are less likely to complete their college degrees and more likely to have unplanned pregnancies.1 Most concerning, especially for impulsive girls, is their potential for self-harm, which is significantly higher than for girls without ADHD.

“Our findings of extremely high rates of cutting and other forms of self-injury, along with suicide attempts, show us that the long-term consequences of ADHD in females can be profound,” says head researcher, UCSF psychologist Stephen Hinshaw, Ph.D., author of the 2014 book The ADHD Explosion.

Click here to view original web page at www.additudemag.com