Confidence

Nurturing Healthy Self Esteem in Children

Confidence is a social emotional skill and can be nurtured, practiced, and learned. It helps children feel secure, capable and high-achieving. A University of Melbourne study showed a definite, positive correlation between belief in oneself and success or achievement. Confident children grow up to become successful adults, empowered to face life’s challenges and achieve their most lofty goals.

Confidence nears the top of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. The need for respect, esteem and confidence, is a requirement for all well-functioning human beings. When your child’s basic needs for survival are met, giving them opportunities to feel justly praised, recognized, and competent helps facilitate healthy development. Every parent wants the best for their children, and confidence is at the core. We have taken the mystery out of building confidence by developing programs that work and re-invented them in interactive games and comics to eliminate the struggle. There is no trait that replaces confidence in children and adults. That is, if your child communicates well and demonstrates self-discipline and empathy, he will still need to develop his self-confidence in order to achieve success. At curaFUN, we help parents raise confident children who trust themselves, are comfortable in their own skin, and aren’t afraid to go for their goals, starting from social initiation.

How confident are you?

Preview of the foundational skills we teach

Training List

COLLABORATION

Determine who is available and compatible

Training List

SOCIAL INITIATION

Overcome shyness and social anxiety. Find friends with similar interests and values.

Training List

PERSEVERENCE

Positively initiate a conversation with a group after being rejected

Training List

PARTICIPATION

Ask to join a game already in progress. Be flexible when things change. 

Training List

ETIQUETTE

Interrupt and leave a conversation appropriately

INDEPENDENCE

Decide whether to play with a group, another peer, or by yourself

What kind of life do you envision for your child? Whether it’s happiness, affluence, or academic achievement, self-confidence will be integral.

"You can conquer almost any fear if you will only make up your mind to do so. For remember, fear doesn't exist anywhere except in the mind. "
-Dale Carnegie

Studies show that primary school children who were confident performed better at school and bagged academic achievements regardless of their age, cognitive ability, and gender. Like Rome, confidence isn’t built in a day. It requires a nurturing environment, the right training, and consistent practice and encouragement. curaFUN games and comics employ a scientifically based and systematic approach to building confidence starting with guided practice with professional feedback in social initiation, peer interaction, and confronting bullies.

The World Belongs To Those Who Believe In Themselves!

Social Skill

Successful People Have One Thing in Common: High Self-Confidence

But how does one develop strong self confidence?
As a society, we chase after self-confidence and try to promote it in children by giving out participation awards in the fear of leaving any child feeling left out. But do abundant encouragement and praise result in higher self confidence?

In a recent study, children who had a positive but inaccurate perception of their performance were more susceptible to being depressed than those who had a more realistic rating of their performance. Undeserved praise can lead to a flawed portrayal of oneself, which may eventually lead to poor self-esteem. Rather than dishing out unwarranted or unmerited praise, parents can encourage children by urging them to stretch and grow, trying new things and challenging themselves often.

  • Unlimited play, self-paced program
  • Progressive training in areas of impulse control, focus, social initiation, teamwork, perspective taking, emotional regulation and more
  • 30-day money-back guarantee.  Cancel anytime

Zoo Academy

$10USD/month
*Billed monthly for 12 months.

Zoo U

$10USD/month
*Billed monthly for 12 months.

Zoo Academy

$35USD/Year
*One-time payment for 12-month access.

Zoo U

$35USD/Year
*One-time payment for 12-month access.
Sport and the socio-emotional development of children

Sport and the socio-emotional development of children

Copyrights: Pro Sport Development A new research study by Pro Sport Development analyzes the impact of their Community Sports Program on the socio-emotional development of children.

Pro Sport Development (PSD) , in collaboration with Participatory Research in Asia (PRIA) initiated an in-depth evaluation to better understand the impact of its Community Sports Program (CSP) on the socio-emotional development of children in Bhubaneswar, Odisha.

The overall intended impact of the CSP is to help children from marginalized backgrounds improve their socio-emotional health and well-being, and empower them to become confident and competent leaders within their own communities.

Over the past few years, the changes created by the program have been documented through articles, videos and case studies focusing on individual participants’ stories of change. In addition, analysis using secondary data pertaining to the CSP participants has been conducted. However, up until 2019, only basic quantitative data along with limited qualitative assessments were utilized to evaluate the impact of PSD’s sport for development initiative in Bhubaneswar.

Methodology

For the evaluation of the CSP in 2020-21, a mixed-methods approach was utilized. An exploratory design procedure was used, wherein the quantitative data was collected first, followed by the collection of qualitative data.

Within the quantitative data, baseline and end-line surveys were used with both target and control groups to analyze the changes in their socio-emotional wellbeing. For qualitative data, interviews with select participants, along with their families and PSD trainers, were conducted.

Quantitative data

A total of 267 children from two schools participated in the pre and post intervention surveys conducted for this evaluation. The target group (n=175) consisted of children registered for the CSP at the time of the baseline data collection, and were part of the online intervention implemented through the year. The control group (n=92) comprised of those children from the same schools who did not and have never previously participated in the CSP.

However, as seen in the data analysis of the surveys, the average responses and index scores of a few indicators of both the target respondents and control group have shown a positive change, whereas others have shown a negative change over the evaluation period. Interestingly, the change witnessed in the baseline and endline data for the average responses and index scores for all indicators for both the target respondents and control group follow very similar patterns.

Qualitative data

Qualitative data was also collected as part of the evaluation, in the form ... Read More
How Pursuing a Quest Can Bring Purpose to Your Life

How Pursuing a Quest Can Bring Purpose to Your Life

In 2002, I walked into a cafe, laptop in hand, to begin a grand adventure.

My adventure did not involve swords, dragons, or golden cups; it didn’t require me to hike the Appalachian trail or steer a boat solo across the world. All I had to do was sip a cappuccino and tap away at my keyboard. After years of detour as a corporate lawyer, I was finally allowing myself to reach that mythical state of being I’d dreamed of since age four: becoming “a writer.”

Believe me when I tell you that I had no idea I would ever publish a best-selling book. My goal was simply to publish something— anything —by age seventy-five. That took the pressure off and put me in a state of near constant flow, and occasional bliss. I wrote a play, a memoir, poetry, and half a novel.

After three years, I started writing Quiet and knew instinctively that this was the one.

But the adventure began long before Quiet and its runaway success. The adventure was the simple act of trying to become a writer in the first place.

In September 2014, my friend Chris Guillebeau came out with a wonderful new book . A book about quests and adventures and about how doing that big crazy (or quiet and intimate) thing you’ve always dreamed of may be the best thing you’ll ever do.

I’ll let Chris tell you all about it…

How Pursuing a Quest Can Bring Purpose to Your Life

by Chris Guillebeau

We all like to adopt habits and make choices that improve our lives—or at least we like the idea of doing so. Small changes can lead to big results, whether it’s being mindful about what we eat or trying to get an extra hour of sleep. Improvement is good.

But what if there’s something bigger that you could do…something that would fundamentally change your life for the better? After thinking carefully about what you enjoy doing and what you find most meaningful, maybe you should think about making that thing the focus of your daily life for years to come.

Perhaps you should consider a quest .For the past ten years, I’ve been pursuing a grand adventure . Even as an introvert (or perhaps because I’m an introvert), I’ve always loved travel, whether it’s exploring new cities and losing myself in foreign markets or heading into a small village after an extended bus ride from ... Read More
Nexus of Good: Building emotional resilience

Nexus of Good: Building emotional resilience

Children from low socio-economic background lack the essential skills to cope up with emotional and financial instability caused by poverty. Currently, 128 million children are enrolled in the Indian public education system. These children live in poverty, with most having a household income of USD two or less a day.

Their vulnerabilities lead to reduced attentiveness, lack of curiosity, demotivation, powerlessness, shame and anger. These factors result in reduced motivation to learn, relationship building skills and emotional resilience. Apart from affecting their academic performance, this also takes a toll on their mental and emotional well-being, overall productivity and life choices. More specifically, this makes them less likely to pursue higher education, decrease employability and disrupt their positive mental health.

Children from the low socio-economic background in India generally lack the resources to access private education and rely rather on public education. Within such systems, at the government and the teacher level, there is a general alignment on the need to focus on the holistic improvement of underprivileged children.

However, the government and the teachers currently lack the expertise to equip children with the necessary skills to tackle the ill-effects of poverty, cope up with their reality and go on to become productive and healthy lifelong learners. As a result, there is an alarming gap between the skills our most vulnerable children need and the skills that the public education system provides.

It is in the aforementioned context that Richa Gupta, Vedant Jain and Malika Taneja founded Labhya Foundation, an educational non-profit that enables children from low socio-economic backgrounds with necessary skills to cope with the ill-effects of poverty and become life-long learners through Social Emotional Learning (SEL) interventions at scale. The founders themselves came from the realities of social adversity, financial instability and emotional distress. They had to cope with their realities of financial and emotional instability at a young age. However, there was a clear understanding that their journeys had been driven by unique opportunities and access that not all children from low socio-economic backgrounds have. This understanding drove Labhya Foundation's inception in 2017 and continues to define its mission, vision and work through the years.

SEL is the process of exploring one's emotions, maintaining healthy relationships and understanding one's role and purpose in the long term. It is considered one of the most powerful tools for social change and poverty reduction: every USD invested in SEL programmes yields USD 11 in lifelong gains ... Read More
Adolescent Brains Are Wired to Want Status and Respect: That’s an Opportunity for Teachers and Parents

Adolescent Brains Are Wired to Want Status and Respect: That’s an Opportunity for Teachers and Parents

Credit: Alison Seiffer Here is a parable for our time: There once was an adult who wanted to encourage eighth graders to eat healthier food. The adult designed a lesson plan full of nutritional information—why fruit and vegetables are good for you, why junk food is bad for you, and so on. A similar approach had worked with younger children. But the eighth graders declared the intervention—and, if we’re being honest, the adult—boring. They carried on eating junk food, some of them in greater quantities than they had before.

Versions of that story play out in real life all the time, although the age of the adolescents varies, and the goal could be anything from reducing bullying or depression to increasing engagement with math. With discouraging regularity, researchers find that what works with younger children is no longer effective with adolescents. Eighth grade seems to be the inflection point.

If we thought more carefully about what it is to be an eighth grader, however, down to the level of changes in the brain, our parable could have a happier ending. Thirteen-year-olds are concerned with status and respect—these kids do not want to feel patronized by adults. In a study published in 2019 in Nature Human Behaviour, instead of nutritional information, researchers showed more than 300 eighth graders in Texas investigative reports revealing that food company executives use unhealthy ingredients, target young adolescents in their marketing, and won’t let their own children eat their products. The students were outraged and began to see healthy eating as a way of taking a stand against being manipulated. For the next three months the students made healthier snack purchases in the cafeteria. And in a follow-up study, the researchers found that the students, especially boys, with higher levels of testosterone (a marker of pubertal maturation in both boys and girls) were most likely to respond well to the intervention. Advertisement Over the past 15 years neuroscience has dramatically changed our understanding of the structural and functional changes in the brain during adolescence, which runs from around the age of 10 all the way into the mid-20s. It is a time of rapid brain growth and neuronal fine-tuning when young people are especially sensitive to social cues and rewards. More recent research has focused on how the adolescent brain interacts with the social environment. It shows that social context and acceptance strongly influence behavior. Adolescence might even ... Read More
Opinion: Overcoming stigma as an Asian American with ADHD

Overcoming stigma as an Asian American with ADHD

In many Asian American families, a good education and success in school is prioritized above all else. According to Eurekalert, a science news website, this high academic pressure stems from Asian cultures believing that academic success is the only way to climb up the economic ladder. This strict viewpoint is imposed upon Asian American high school students with immigrant parents, and many of these students struggle with this pressure. Meeting such academic standards is even more challenging for learning disabled Asian American children. And I am one of them. As a Chinese student diagnosed with ADHD and ADD, it is extremely hard to cope with the fact you have a learning disorder. Some people in my Asian community did not acknowledge my learning disabilities, as traditional Chinese people look down upon learning disabilities. ADHD, ADD, and other learning disabilities are considered shameful in the Chinese community. People who dismissed my ADHD and ADD just assumed I was “not smart,” and that was a “fault” of my parents. For many, there is no such thing as ADHD and ADD — they believe this is just a cover-up for laziness. In an article from Understood, a website devoted to educating the public about learning disabilities, Professor Manju Banerjee states that Asian American parents believe that their child’s learning disability is a result of bad parenting. Therefore, these parents do not feel comfortable revealing data or information on their child’s learning struggles. Thus, there is a scarcity of literature investigating ADHD among Asian Americans, but it’s not because ADHD affects fewer Asian students. According to the National Association of School Psychologists, the lack of data on Asian learning disabled children could be due to the fact that fewer Asian families report their children as learning disabled, due to the stigma. Because of the stigma of ADHD, my ADHD was not even recognized until I was in middle school. I began falling behind in my classes because I was unable to complete my work or focus for at least 30 minutes. However, none of my teachers or counselors believed I had ADHD because I still managed to keep up good grades. And I think it was also rare for them to see an Asian student with ADHD, so I believe this is why my learning disabilities were so often ignored. Teachers were unaware of all my sleepless nights and hours of frustration trying to ... Read More
Study: Asians Perceived To Lack Charisma

Study: Asians Perceived To Lack Charisma

Why do we see fewer Asian Americans in senior management positions? In the first study on Asian Americans and perceptions of leadership, researchers found that Asians are seen as having less charisma when compared to their white counterparts — a trait that's often synonymous with leadership in Western societies. Host Michel Martin discusses the findings of this new study with lead author, Thomas Sy, of the University of California, Riverside. I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, my weekly Can I Just Tell You commentary. That's in just a few minutes.

But first, you may have heard the phrase model minority used to describe Asian-Americans. That's because they are popularly perceived to have strong study and work habits, behave with discipline, and willingly adopt American culture. But that stereotype, favorable as it may seem, is not helpful when it comes to being viewed as leaders.

A new study says that Asian-Americans, when compared with white Americans especially, are thought to be lacking in charisma and thus lacking in leadership ability in business and the board room. And these results may help explain why we see a smaller percentage of Asian-Americans in top management than whites, the researchers say.

To learn more about this study and how the results might be used in real life, we've called the lead author of the study, Thomas Sy. He's an assistant professor of psychology at the University of California Riverside. And he's with us from NPR West in Culver City, California. Thanks so much for joining us.

Professor THOMAS SY (University of California Riverside): Thanks for having me, Michel.

MARTIN: So I'm going to ask you to try to explain as simply as you can what was your methodology.

Prof. SY: Sure.

MARTIN: But the basic core question is, is there a stereotype that Asian-Americans are technically competent, but somehow not qualified for the top job?

Prof. SY: That's a fairly accurate statement. MARTIN: So how did you go around testing that idea? Prof. SY: Sure, sure. So we provided them with an evaluation of an employee. This description gives fairly basic information. And all participants get the same type of information. The only thing that we varied was race itself. For our Caucasian counterpart, the description of this employee was John Davis. For our Asian counterpart it was Tung-Sheng Wong. In addition to name, we varied it by providing with demographic information. We literally ... Read More
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