Cooperate to Lead

Cooperation, Teamwork and Leadership Skills and Their Impact On Children's Emotional Wellbeing

John Donne said it best: “No man is an Island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent.” Development of children's cooperation skills result in reduced conflicts (peer pressure, bullying) and improved social relationship, as well as good preparation for leadership. Through realistic interactive social problem solving, curaFUN programs train youth to collaborate, seek cooperation from others, think flexibly and positively and negotiate.

Can your kids benefit from these high-level skills?

Training List

LEADERSHIP

Delegate and collaborate in teams

Training List

PROJECT MANAGEMENT

Prioritize and schedule tasks to achieve goals

Training List

DIVERSITY

Work with people from different backgrounds and personalities

Training List

NEGOTIATION

Understand perspectives. Compromise when necessary.

Training List

POSITIVE THINKING

Persevere and problem-solve even through difficult situations

Training List

SELF ADVOCACY

Effectively seek help from appropriate sources

Great Leader Are Not Born. Whether You're Preparing Your Child For Competition or Student Government, We Can Help!

In a high-IQ job pool, soft skills like discipline, drive, and empathy mark those who emerge as outstanding.
-Daniel Goleman

Great leaders are not born. Whether you’re preparing your child for student government, competition teams, give them the edge up with our proven social emotional learning programs. The foundational skills on this page are just some of the foundational skills covered in curaFUN’s programs. We take children through realistic social problem-solving scenarios, and reinforce instructions with dynamic practices of the learned skills. Improved performance in our programs have been shown to reflect progress in real life and long-lasting.

Social Skill

Interactive Social Problem Solving

According to Swiss psychologist Piaget, children begin the transition out of egocentrism when they begin to recognize the existence and feelings of those around them. This process can be encouraged and nurtured with curaFUN’s products, which replicate natural gamified environments and give children the opportunity to practice.

Common challenges like deciding whether to work alone or work with others appear in gameplay to allow children the chance to learn by trial and error and internalize new concepts and better alternative problem-solving strategies.


  • Unlimited play, self-paced program
  • Progressive training in areas of impulse control, focus, social initiation, teamwork, perspective taking, emotional regulation and more
  • 30-day money-back guarantee.  Cancel anytime

Zoo Academy

$10USD/month
*Billed monthly for 12 months.

Zoo U

$10USD/month
*Billed monthly for 12 months.

Zoo Academy

$35USD/Year
*One-time payment for 12-month access.

Zoo U

$35USD/Year
*One-time payment for 12-month access.

Children who find it difficult to cooperate at an early age can face problems in developing healthy relationships later in life and struggle in their careers. Edward Norton is a great example: despite his talent as an actor, he has missed out on career-changing opportunities like the role of the Hulk in the new Marvel movies because of his notorious inability to cooperate on set.

Common challenges like deciding whether to work alone or work with others appear in gameplay to allow children the chance to learn by trial and error and internalize new concepts and better alternative problem-solving strategies.

Quiz Cat: No Quiz found

 

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